JOHN WHITMORE COACHING PDF

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John Whitmore, Coaching for Performance (Chapter 1 – What Is Coaching?) Page 1. An Extract from. Coaching for Performance. GROWing People. Sir John Whitmore and Performance Consultants wisely reveal how to use coaching to close that gap between what is only tolerable and what is possible in both. A Conversation with Sir John Whitmore. Interview Conducted by Agnes Mura. This article first appeared in the International Journal of Coaching in Organizations.


John Whitmore Coaching Pdf

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GROW is Not Coaching! It is important to remember that GROW is not coaching in itself. As Sir John. Whitmore warns, “even dictators can use GROW!. globally, Coaching for. Performance is built on the work of senior industry leaders . Sir John Whitmore, Tim Gallwey and Gita Bellin. For more than. 30 years their. Jeroen De Flander – coaching tips PDF 1 This is a print version . Most of the coaching tips come from working with Sir John Whitmore, the.

As with many simple principles, any user of GROW can apply a great deal of skill and knowledge at each stage but the basic process remains as written above. There are numerous questions which the coach could use at any point and part of the skill of the coach is to know which questions to use and how much detail to uncover. This example deals with weight loss.

If the client wants: "To bring my weight down to pounds in three months and keep it down", that is their Goal. The more heartfelt and personal, the more meaningful the goal is to the person and the more likely they will be to commit to and achieve the goal.

The coach would then ask awareness questions to deepen understanding of what is happening when the client tries to lose weight, thus identifying the Obstacles.

These questions could include: When you have been able to lose weight — what made the difference?

What is the difference between the times you are able to keep weight off and the times when you put it on again? What would have to change for you to be sure you could lose the weight and keep it off? If the client genuinely answers these questions they will discover new information about what works and does not work for them in terms of weight loss, and create some potential for change.

It then becomes possible to create some strategies or Options which get around the Obstacles. These could include looking at which diets or exercise regimes work best, or finding a specific type of support.

Once the client knows the strategies that are likely to work they can establish a Way Forward which involves taking action steps.

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This is where they commit to what they will do in the short term to put the strategies into effect. For instance, one action might be asking a particular person for support, and another might be to download a different selection of foods.

GROW neatly highlights the nature of a problem for coaching purposes. In order for a problem to exist in coaching terms there has to be two elements present. Firstly there has to be something that the client is trying to achieve — the Goal. Then there has to be something stopping them achieve that goal — the Obstacle s.

Using GROW automatically breaks a problem down into these component parts. The same principles can be applied whatever goal or problem the client has. GROW can be used on technical problems, issues regarding processes, strategy questions, interpersonal issues and many more.

History of coaching.

The model can also be used by a group who are all working on the same problem or goal. The parallel between Gallwey's Inner Game method and the GROW method can be illustrated by the example of players who do not keep their eyes on the ball.

Some coaches might give instructions such as: "Keep your eye on the ball" to try to correct this. This example deals with weight loss. If the client wants: "To bring my weight down to pounds in three months and keep it down", that is their Goal. The more heartfelt and personal, the more meaningful the goal is to the person and the more likely they will be to commit to and achieve the goal. The coach would then ask awareness questions to deepen understanding of what is happening when the client tries to lose weight, thus identifying the Obstacles.

These questions could include: When you have been able to lose weight — what made the difference? What is the difference between the times you are able to keep weight off and the times when you put it on again?

What would have to change for you to be sure you could lose the weight and keep it off? If the client genuinely answers these questions they will discover new information about what works and does not work for them in terms of weight loss, and create some potential for change. It then becomes possible to create some strategies or Options which get around the Obstacles. These could include looking at which diets or exercise regimes work best, or finding a specific type of support.

Once the client knows the strategies that are likely to work they can establish a Way Forward which involves taking action steps.

This is where they commit to what they will do in the short term to put the strategies into effect. For instance, one action might be asking a particular person for support, and another might be to download a different selection of foods.

GROW neatly highlights the nature of a problem for coaching purposes.

In order for a problem to exist in coaching terms there has to be two elements present. Firstly there has to be something that the client is trying to achieve — the Goal.

Coaching for performance A conversation with Sir John Whitmore by Mura 2003.pdf

Then there has to be something stopping them achieve that goal — the Obstacle s. Using GROW automatically breaks a problem down into these component parts. The same principles can be applied whatever goal or problem the client has. GROW can be used on technical problems, issues regarding processes, strategy questions, interpersonal issues and many more. The model can also be used by a group who are all working on the same problem or goal.

GROW model

The parallel between Gallwey's Inner Game method and the GROW method can be illustrated by the example of players who do not keep their eyes on the ball. Some coaches might give instructions such as: "Keep your eye on the ball" to try to correct this.

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The problem with this sort of instruction is that a player will be able to follow it for a short while but may be unable to keep it in mind in the long term. So one day, instead of giving an instruction, Gallwey asked players to say "bounce" out loud when the ball bounced and "hit" out loud when they hit the ball.The parallel between Gallwey's Inner Game method and the GROW method can be illustrated by the example of players who do not keep their eyes on the ball. Coaching Tips: So I believe that coaching people is service to the individual but it is also service to getting this planet well.

When providing your input, make it as short as possible. Psychotherapy raises and helps to overcome stressful moments from the past that affect the present.

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It might give you the desired outcome in the short-term but will always backfire and create more problems at a later stage. But if it leads that way I would go in that direction.

On the one hand there is mass availability of personal coaches who do telephone work, A. This is different from counseling or mentoring. Even after years of coaching, I still find it refreshing and rewarding to coach coaches.

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